Vitamin Deficiency Syndrome – From Anti Aging Book

Vitamin A (Retinol)

Deficiency Syndrome

Vitamin A deficiency is associated with night blindness or loss of adaptation to the dark; dry eye disease; sty in the eye; increased susceptibility to infection; sinus and bronchial infections; drying out of skin and mucous membrane; loss of taste and smell. Which leads to loss of appetite; loss of vigor; defective teeth and gums; and slowed growth.

People who eat little liver, dairy foods and beta-carotene containing vegetables are at risk of developing vitamin A deficiency, although severe deficiencies causing blindness are extremely rare in the western world. People with disease causing malabsorption, such as HIV, are also at risk.

Beta – Carotene (Pro –Vitamin A)

Deficiency Syndrome

          Beta – Carotene is not an essential nutrient; therefore, it is not possible to develop a true deficiency. However, alcohol consumption decreases beta – carotene into vitamin A. Research has also found that elderly people with type II diabetes have significantly lower blood levels of carotenoids. Thus such people may benefit from supplementary beta-carotene.

Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

Deficiency Syndrome

Vitamin B1 deficiency causes the condition beri-beri, which includes mental illness, paralysis of some eye muscles, foot drop, and decreased sensation in the feet and legs. Other symptoms of deficiency include loss of appetite; fatigue; weakness; neuritis; muscle atrophy; head pressures; poor sleep; feeling tense and irritable; aches and pains; subjectively poor memory; difficulty concentrating; constipation; impaired growth; and “pins and needles” sensation in the toes and “burning” sensation in the feet. Alcohol consumption interferes with the absorption of vitamin B1.

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin or Cyanocobalamin)

Deficiency Syndrome

Deficiency of vitamin B12 is associated with pernicious anemia including weakness, a sore and inflamed tongue that appears smooth and shiny, numbness and tingling in extremeties, pallor, weak pulse, stiffness, drowsiness, irritability, depression, mental deterioration, senile dementia, paranoid psychosis, chronic fatigue syndrome, diarrhea, poor appetite, and growth failure in children. Health experts estimate that as many as one in five adults have a vitamin B12 deficiency. The elderly, gastpeople whose gastrointestinal status is compromised (by gastritis or gastrectomy), those with autoimmune disorders (including type 1, or insulin dependent diabetes mellitus and thyroid disease), and individuals recieving long – term therapy with gastric acid inhibitors or biguanide drugs may all benefit form vitamin B12 supplementation. As vitamin B12 is not found in plant foods unless they are fortified (for example, breakfast  cereal), vegans are vunerable to B12 deficiency and are likely to benefit from supplementation.

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

Deficiency Syndrome

Symptoms include cheilosis or cracks and sores in the corners of the mouth; frayed or scaling lips; inflammed tongue with purplish or magenta color; eczema or seborrhea; flaking skin around the nose, eyebrows, chin, cheeks, earlobes, or hairline; oily appearance of nose, chin and forehead with fatty deposits accumulating under the skin; bloodshot, watering, itching, burning, fatigued eyes with a keen sensitivity to light; increased in cataract formation; nervous symptoms such as “pins and needles” sensation, difficulty walking, muscular weakness, trembling and a lack of stamina or vigor; behavioral changes such as depression, moodiness, nervousness and irritability.

Results of a study published in 2000 revealed that pregnant women wiith a vitamin B2 deficiency may be either at higher risk of developing the dangerous condition preeclampsia.

Vitamin B3 (Niacin, Niacinamide, Nicotinic Acid, Nicotinamide)

Deficiency Syndromes

Vitamin B3 deficiency can cause the condition pellagra (symptoms include dermatitis, diarrhea and dementia). Other symptoms of deficiency are bright red tongue; sore tongue and gums; inflammed mouth, throat and esophagus; canker sores; mental illness; perceptual changes in the 5 senses; schizophrenic symptoms; rheumatoid arthritis; muscle weakness; general fatigue; irritability; recurring headaches; indigestion; nausea; vomitting; bad breath; insomnia; and small ulcera.

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid, Calcium Pantothenate, Panthenol)

Deficiency Syndrome

Deficiency Syndrome include a burning sensation in the feet; enlarged beefy furrowed tongue; skin disorders such as eczema; duodenal ulcers, inflammation of the intestines and stomach; decreased antibody formation; upper respiratory infections; vomitting; restlessness; muscle cramps; constipation; sensitivity to insulin; adrenal exhaustion; physical and mental depression; overwhelming fatigue; reduced production of hydrochloric acid in the stomach; allergies; arthtritis; nerve degeneration; spinal curvature; disturbed pulse rate; gout; and graying hair.

          Vitamin B5 deficiencies are rare. Alcoholics are at the highest risk of developing a deficiency.

Vitamin B6 (Pyroxidine)

Deficiency Syndrome

Symptoms of vitamin B6 deficiency includes greasy, scaly dermatitis between the eyebrows and on body parts the rub together; low blood sugarl numbness and tingling in the hands and feet; neuritis; arthritis; trembling hands in the aged; water retention and swelling during pregnancy; nausea; motion sickness; mental retardation; epilepsy; kidney stones; anemia; excessive fatigue; nervous breakdown; mental illness; acne; and convulsions. Babies and newborn infants may develop crusty yellow scabs called “craddle cap.” Government surveys suggest that as many as one – third of U.S. adults suffer from vitamin B6 deficiency.

Folic Acid (Folacin, Folate)

Deficiency Syndrome

Folic acid deficiency symptoms include anemia; poor growth; weakness; an inflammed and sore tongue that may appear smooth and shiny; numbness or tingling in the hands and feet; indigestion; diarrhea; depression; irritability; pallor; drowsiness; a slow, weakened pulse; graying hair; mental illness; impaired wound healing; reduced resistance to infection; birth defects resulting in spina bifida and other neural tube defects; toxemia; insomnia; leg numbness and cramps in pregnant women; premature birth and after birth hemorrhaging; cervival cancer; and dysplasia.

Inositol Hexanicotinate

Deficiency Syndrome

Inositol hexanicotinate is not essential for health, thus no deficiency symptoms are recognized. However, people displaying symptoms of niacin (vitamin B3) deficiency may benefit from inositol hexanicotinate. Naicin deficiency can cause the condition pellagra (symptoms include dermatitis, diarrhea, and dementia). Other symptoms of deficiency are bright reed tongue; sore tongue and gums; inflammed mouth, throat and esophagus; canker sores; mental illness; perceptual changes in  the 5 senses; schizophrenic symptoms; rheumatoid arthritis; muscle weakness; general fatigue; irritability; reccuring headaches; indigestion; nausea; vomitting; bad breath; insomnia; and small ulcers.

Pyrroloquinoline Quinone (PQQ)

Deficiency Syndrome

Mice fed a PQQ-deficient diet grew slowly, had fragile skin and a reduced immune response.

 

PABA (Para-Amino-Benzoic Acid)

Deficiency Syndrome

Similar to symptoms caused by folic acid or pantothenic acid deficiency; but including vitiligo, fatigue, irritability, depression, nervousness, headache, constipation and other digestive disorders.

Vitamin C (Ascorbic Acid)

Deficiency Syndrome

Vitamin C deficiency can cause the disease scurvy; however, this is uncommon in developed countries. Symptoms of vitamin C include bruising easily, bleeding gums, tooth decay, nosebleed, swollen or painful joints, anemia, poor wound healing, lowered resistance to infection, general weakening of connective tissue,easily fractured bones, weakened arteries that rupture or hemorrhage, extreme muscle weakness, painful joints, and wounds and sores that will not heal.

Ascorbyl Palmitate

Deficiency Syndrome

Not Applicable

Vitamin D (Ergocalciferol)

Deficiency Syndrome

Osteomalacia (softening of the bones) in adults, rickets in children, irritability, fitful sleeping, frequent, heavy perspiration behind the neck in babies, delayed eruption of teeth, soft and yielding skull, bowed legs, knock kness, depression in the chest, pigeon – chest deformity of the rib cage, swayback, overly prominent forehead causing the appearance of sunken eyes and delayed walking.

          Results of a study by Tangpricha, et al. (American Journal of Medicine 2002;112:659-662) revealed that many young adults suffer from vitamin D deficiency. 30% of young adults were found to be deficient at the end of winter , and 11% in the summer. The most-affected age group was the 18 – 29 year old, 36% of whom were suffering from vitamin D deficiency by the time spring arrived.

 

Vitamin E (Tocopherol)

Deficiency Syndrome

Vitamin E deficiencies are extremely rare. Symptoms include decreased survival time of red blood cells, faulty fat absorption, anemia in premature infants, degeneration of the brain and spinal cord, premature births and higher risk of miscarriage, decrease in sex hormones, and a higher risk of skin cancer.

Vitamin K (Phylloquinone)

Deficiency Syndrome

Dietary deficiencies of vitamin K are rare, because vitamin K is normally manufactured by bacteria present in the intestine. However, symptoms may include hypoprothrombinemia (a condition in which the time it takes for the blood to clot is prolonged), hemorrhage, bloody urine and stools, nosebleeds and miscarriages. Deficiency in newborn babies results in bloody stools or vomitting (fairly common since newborns have no intestinal bacteria). Recent studies suggest that many men and women aged 18 – 44 regularly consume less than the RDA of vitamin K.

Alpha Lipolic Acid

Deficiency Syndrome

Humans are not known to develop deficiencies of alpha lipolic acid as the body manfactures it on demand.

Bioflavonoids (Flavonoids, Rutin, Hesperidin, OPCs, Vitamin P)

Deficiency Syndrome

Edema or accumulation of fluid in the tissue, bleeding into the tissue (noticeable as red spots and splotches when it occurs close under the skin) resulting from fragile, faulty capillaries.

Biotin

Deficiency Syndrome

Scaly dermatitis, inflammed sore tongue, loss of appetite, nausea, depressions, muscle pain, sitophobia (morbid dread of food), pallor, anemia, abnormalities of heart function, burning or prickling sensations, sensitive skin, insomnia, extreme lassitude, increased cholesterol and depression of immune system.

Carotenoids

Deficiency Syndrome

Not Applicable

Choline

Deficiency Syndrome

Choline deficiency symptoms include fatty liver and liver damage.

 

Coenzyme Q10

Deficiency Syndrome

Not Known

 

 

 

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