RENEW YOUR LIFE

RENEW YOUR LIFE

BRENDA WATSON, C.T.

CHAPTER 2: IMPAIRED DIGESTION
 
CAUSES OF POOR DIGESTION:
 
1. PROCESSED FOOD CONSUMPTION
 

  • A steady diet of refined carbohydrates forces the body to rob itself of the chromium, manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, and magnesium needed to digest the carbohydrates. Once these minerals are depleted, the body is unable to digest carbohydrates properly (processed or natural). Consequently, these properly digested foods will ferment into simple sugars and alcohol, providing fuel for yeast and bacteria and leading to indigestion, gas and bloating, which increases the body’s toxic load.
2. IMPROPER FOOD COMBINING
 

  • These two rules are: (1) Eat fruits alone or leave them alone (Fruit is most beneficial when eaten 20 to 30 minutes before other food.) And (2) Do not combine proteins and starchy carbohydrates at the same meal. Disregarding these rules can slow down digestion, resulting in much gas and bloating.
CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS OF IMPAIRED DIGESTION:
 
1. LOW PRODUCTION OF HYDROCHLORIC ACID
 

  • Adequate production of HCl is critical to good health and a properly functioning digestive system because it:
    • Helps breakdown protein
    • Sterilizes food by destroying bacteria and microbes that are present
    • Is required for production of intrinsic factor (needed for B12 absorption)
    • Is needed for mineral absorption
    • Signals the pancreas to secrete enzymes in the small intestine

  • In other words, you may experience heartburn or indigestion if you produce too much or not enough stomach acid.

  • Prior to the 1960’s, it was common for physicians to prescribe betaine hydrochloride for cases of indigestion or heartburn. I have personally found this to be effective at relieving heartburn and indigestion.

  • Other problems with low HCl include poor mineral absorption and reduced enzyme production. The presence of HCl in the duodenum signals the pancreas to release water, bicarbonate and enzymes. When the pH of the stomach is elevated or alkaline (due to HCl deficiency), the pH of the rest of the body can become imbalance. The body cannot maintain homeostasis under these conditions, and serious degenerative disease, including cancer, congestive heart failure, osteoporosis and Alzheimer’s disease, can result.
2. ANTACIDS…THE SOLUTION OR THE PROBLEM
 

  • Many antacids contain aluminum compounds, which can bind the bowels, accumulate in the brain and could be a factor in the eventual development of Alzheimer’s disease. Aluminum-containing antacids can also cause long-term depletion of the calcium stored in the body, contributing to osteoporosis.
3. PANCREATIC INSUFFICIENY
 

  • Part of the job of protease enzymes is to prevent allergic reactions resulting from the absorption of non-digested protein, which causes an immune response in the lymphatic tissue of the intestinal tract.

  • Pancreatic insufficiency is an underlying cause of high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). It is commonly found in people with candidiasis (an overgrowth of the yeast germ Candida albicans) and those with parasite infections.

  • Symptoms of pancreatic insufficiency include gas, indigestion, abdominal discomfort, bloating, food sensitivities, and the presence of fat (and other food) in the stool.
4. FOOD SENSITIVITIES

  • When undigested food particles enter the lymphatic system through the walls of the intestine, the body responds as if they were foreign invaders, known as antigens. An immune attack begins with the body producing antibodies (chemical bullets), which bind to the antigens, forming what are known as immune complexes. When this occurs, there may be enough of an immune system imbalance to create indigestion. In addition, stress can create a sympathetic dominance (fight or flight syndrome), which impairs indigestion. Both of these responses can increase intestinal permeability and lead to more food sensitivities.
CHAPTER 3: EFFECTS OF DIGESTIVE DYSFUNCTION
 
1. INTESTINAL TOXEMIA
 

  • In the words of Dr. John Matsen, ND, “If you don’t digest your food quickly, some microorganisms will digest it for you, making toxins.” The waste products from these microorganisms produce some extremely potent toxins, 78 known types, including skatoles, indols, phenols, alcohol, ammonia, acetaldehyde and formaldehyde.
2. CANDIDA AND PARASITES – SECONDARY TOXIC SUPPRESION
 
        CANDIDA AND OTHER FUNGI
 

  • The resulting increased intestinal permeability is known as leaky gut syndrome.

  • Among the fungal toxins that can enter the bloodstream through the bowel wall is acetaldehyde, the major waste product produced by Candida. Acetaldehyde is a poison that is converted by the liver into alcohol.

  • Acetaldehyde is just one of the Candida toxins involved in enzyme destruction, which result in impaired detoxification ability, decreased cellular energy production and a release of cell-damaging free radicals.

  • Of special interest to women is a mycotoxins called zearalenone, which mimics the effects of estrogen in the body. An overabundance of estrogen can result in such health problems as fibroids, breast lumps, infertility and cancer.

  • Special laboratory tests for Candida are available through aware physicians. These tests include Candida antibody panels, intestinal permeability studies and digestive stool analysis.
PARASITES
 

  • Disorders that have been associated with parasites include arthritis, multiple sclerosis, appendicitis, both overweight and underweight conditions, cancer and epilepsy.
3. IMBALANCE OF GUT FLORA
 

  • He theorized that toxic compounds produced by bacterial breakdown of food were the cause of degenerative disease and a major factor in aging.

  • This inhibition of muscular contraction in the cecum causes food residues to concentrate in the appendix where they stagnate and cause inflammation (appendicitis = inflammation of the appendix).
 
4. LEAKY GUT
 

  • According to Elizabeth Lipski, MS, CCN, “NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) can cause irritation and inflammation of the intestinal tract, leading to colitis and relapse of ulcerative colitis… [They] can cause bleeding and ulceration of the large intestine may contribute to complications of diverticular disease [outpouching of a segment of the intestine]. Prolonged use of NSAIDs blocks the body’s natural ability to repair the intestinal lining and also interferes with the production of prostaglandins, regulatory messengers that circulate throughout the body.

  • Now the toxins and food particles, which would normally not be permitted to enter the system, literally leak into the bloodstream. The body then becomes confused and attacks these unwanted toxins, as if they were foreign substances, and develops antibodies (chemical bullets) against them.
5. CHRONIC DISEASE
 

  • The net result is of the above process is development of autoimmune disease, where the body makes antibodies against its own tissue.
CHAPTER 4: TOXIC SUPPRESORS
 
1. DRUGS
 

  • Benzodiazepines –These drugs inhibit phase I detoxification of the liver.

  • Laxatives – Stimulant laxatives, even the herbal variety (such as senna and cascara sagrada), act by irritating the bowel and they can be habit-forming. Laxative abuse can lead to kidney failure.

  • NSAIDs – These drugs inhibit the liver’s phase II detoxification enzyme.

  • Tobacco – the gastrointestinal effects of cadmium poisoning include weight loss, vomiting, an-orexia, diarrhea, constipation and abdominal pain. Exposure to high levels of cadmium can damage kidneys and liver. The metal has also been linked to emphysema.

2. ORAL FOCAL INFECTION
 

  • Details about the problems associated with root canal treatment can be found in Dr. George Meining’s classic book, Root Canal Cover Up.

  • For more information on cavitations, read Susan Stockton’s Beyond Amalgam: The Hidden Health Hazard Posed by Jawbone Cavitations.

3. ENVIRONMENTAL TOXINS

METALS

·          Mercury toxicity can cause a string of negative effects in the digestive system, for it “combines with bile and can cause bile from the gallbladder to become more alkaline, providing a favorable environment for parasites.
 
CHAPTER 5: THE LIVER
 
BILE SECRETION FOR FAT DIGESTION AND TOXIN ELIMINATION
 
·          Where there is insufficient bile, the stool is light in color.
 
·          In the absence of sufficient dietary fiber, the toxins (and the bile) are reabsorbed.
 
HORMONE REGULATION
 
·          Poor liver function, coupled with a deficiency of ‘good’ colonic bacteria, result in hormonal imbalances in both men and women that can put them at risk for developing serious disease.
 
·          Certain B vitamins are needed by the liver to detoxify estrogen and excrete it in the bile. With widespread vitamin B deficiencies, estrogen is not metabolized properly, and the result is increased levels of toxic estrogen metabolites.
 
·          Where there is slow transit time through the digestive tract (as with constipation), there is excessive reabosorption of bile, as well as the toxins in the bile. This will decrease the ability of the liver to function properly.
 
BLOOD SUGAR REGULATION
 
·          GTF and insulin regulate blood sugar levels. The liver works with the pancreas and adrenal glands to regulate blood sugar. If too much sugar comes quickly to the liver from the intestinal tract, the liver will rapidly convert part of the sugar to triglycerides (fats), some of which stored and some released into the blood to be reconverted into glucose (blood sugar) inside the cells.
 
·          This process is extremely important, as it is the primary manner in which dietary sugar can be slowly released into the blood. Elevated blood sugar will cause serious problems. First, the sugar literally sticks to the blood proteins, which can cause the immune system not to recognize the sugar-coated proteins, and an immune attack can occur, which results in free radical production and cellular damage. Second, higher than average blood sugar levels will cause a chronic overproduction of insulin. This desensitizes the cellular insulin receptors, so that the sugar does not enter the cells efficiently, keeping the blood sugar high, creating a vicious cycle leading to type II diabetes.
 
THE PROCESSING OF ALL MATERIALS IN THE BLOOD
 

  • There are basically two types of toxins. Toxins that enter the body from the environment are called exotoxins. Some examples are prescription drugs, alcohol, pesticides, heavy metals and food additives. Anything that enters the body and cannot become food for cells probably needs to be filtered and eliminated. Toxins are also created inside the body. These internally generated toxins are called endotoxins. Endotoxins often originate in the intestinal tract. Many endotoxins are created from undigested food or as a by-product of the overgrowth of bacteria or fungi. Undigested food, acted on by certain types of bacteria, ‘putrefies,’ producing ammonia or alcohol. Such bacteria can produce many different toxins like ammonia, indol or skatole.
  • When the body is deficient in some of these enzymes its phase I detoxification capability is limited.

  • To function properly, cytochrome P450 requires specific nutrients: copper, magnesium, zinc, and vitamin C.

  • Grapefruit, because it inhibits cytochrome P450, should not be eaten if toxic exposure is high or drugs are being taken.

  • If phase I detoxification is inhibited, many prescription and over-the-counter drugs, caffeine, histamine, hormones, benzopyrene (from char-broiled meat), yellow dyes, carbon tetrachloride and insecticides will not be adequately detoxified and will instead be stored in the liver.

  • In phase II, the intermediates must be converted a second time, combining with mineral compounds, amino acids or other biochemicals that are water-soluble and can be excreted in the urine and bile.

  • Each process requires special nutrients and enzymes. If these processes are not functioning in the liver, then there is a delay in the breakdown of toxins, and they can build up in the body.

DYSFUNCTIONS
 

  • Many disease symptoms are the result of the liver losing its regulatory capability due to toxic overload, which is often a result of fermentation and putrefaction in the intestines.

  • The overloaded liver does not have the capability to detoxify adequately. Toxins then circulate to all parts of the body where they’re retained.

  • Liver function is impaired by many factors, including stress, drugs, alcohol, the accumulation of toxins from poor digestion and oral foci, the presence of fungi and parasites, inadequate nutrition, low thyroid function (hypothyroidism), smoking, environmental pollution and negative emotions.

CIRRHOSIS
 

  • When food is not properly digested, toxins are produced in the bowel.

  • Since the toxic stress cycle begins with poor digestion, which sends toxins to the colon and then to the liver, the key to interrupting this cycle is the simultaneous support of these key organs:
    • Liver
    • Intestines (small and large)
    • Stomach

LIVER FUNCTION TESTS
 

  • To evaluate the ability of the liver to detoxify, practitioners of what has been called ‘functional medicine’ (a term coined by Dr. Jeffrey Bland) use special functioning testing. One such test involves having patient swallow capsules containing caffeine, which is detoxified primarily by cytochrome P450 (in phase I). Phase I detox capability is evaluated on the basis of how quickly the caffeine disappears from the blood or saliva. If it does so very slowly, detoxification by the patient is considered poor, owing to low cytochrome P450 activity.

  • A person with poor Phase II conjugation activity (indicated by presence of certain substances in the urine), but rapid Phase I detox capacity, is accumulating toxins that had been created by Phase I activity, though unable to effectively eliminate them from the body (due to low Phase II activity). The result is a build up of intermediary toxic substances, which can be the cause of many problems, as these can be more toxic than the original toxic substances.

CHAPTER 6: THE HEALING PROCESS – MOVING INTO WELLNESS
 
MANAGE STRESS
 
·          The capability of the organs to produce enzymes can be adversely affected by stress.
 
·          The body reacts with antibody production against the undigested food because it is indentified as ‘foreign.’
 

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