New Uses of Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang

New Uses of Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang

abstracted & translated by

Bob Flaws, Dipl. Ac. & C.H., Lic. Ac., FNAAOM, FRCHM

Keywords: Chinese medicine, Chinese herbal medicine, Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang (Supplement the Center & Boost the Qi Decoction), urinary incontinence due to cough, left renal vein compression syndrome, headache, lochiorrhea, dizziness, oral sores, tinnitus, ulcers, external auditory meatus granuloma, nosebleed, epistaxis, parapharyngeal cysts

In issue #2, 2003 of Xin Zhong Yi (New Chinese Medicine), He Hong-quan published an article titled, "New Uses of Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang (Supplement the Center & Boost the Qi Decoction)," on page 68 of that journal. As with most articles of this particular genre of Chinese medical literature, it consisted on several case histories using modifications of this basic formula.

Case 1: Renal vein compression syndrome

The patient was a 33 year-old male who was initially examined on Mar. 6, 2000. The patients body was long and thin and they had had hematuria for five years. This was accompanied by weakness of the extremities, bodily fatigue, lassitude of the spirit, lack of strength, loose stools, and a pale, purplish tongue with thin, white fur. Red blood cells in the urine were ++-+++. Ultrasonography showed left renal vein compression. The patients patterns was, therefore, categorized as spleen-stomach qi vacuity with central qi falling downward complicated by blood stasis. Thus treatment was in order to supplement the center and boost the qi, quicken the blood and transform stasis, and the formula prescribed consisted of: Radix Astragali Membranacei (Huang Qi), 20g, Radix Panacis Ginseng (Ren Shen), Radix Angelicae Sinensis (Dang Gui), Rhizoma Cimicifugae (Sheng Ma), Radix Ligustici Wallichii (Chuan Xiong), Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae (Bai Zhu), uncooked Pollen Typhae (Pu Huang), and Radix Angelicae Anomalae (Liu Ji Nu), 10g each, Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (Chen Pi) and mix-fried Radix Glycyrrhizae Uralensis (Gan Cao), 6g each, and Radix Bupleuri (Chai Hu), powdered Radix Pseudoginseng (San Qi), and Hirudo Seu Whitmania (Shui Zhi), 3g each. These medicinals were decocted in water and administered at one packet per day for two weeks. At the end of that time, the patient reported his symptoms were marked improved and his urine examination showed RBCs at +. Therefore, the same prescription was continued for another month. At that point, RBCs were extremely few. The man was advised to continue taking Bu Zhong Yi Qi Wan (Supplement the Center & Boost the Qi Pills) for another half year. On follow-up after one year, there had been no recurrence.

Case 2: Cough with urinary incontinence

The patient was a 54 year-old female who was initially examined on Apr. 21, 2001. One month previous, the woman had caught a chill which had resulted in a fever, sore throat, nasal congestion, runny nose, and cough with scanty phlegm. The patient was diagnosed with an upper respiratory tract infection, and, after one week of treatment, all her symptoms disappeared except for a cough with no phlegm. Whenever the woman coughed, she discharged urine. The patient had a lusterless facial complexion, dizziness, lack of strength, torpid intake, loose stools, a pale tongue with thin, white fur, and a fine, weak, forceless pulse. Therefore, her pattern was categorized as central qi downward falling with kidney qi not securing. The treatment principles were to supplement the center and boost the qi, secure, astringe, and shrink urination, and the formula prescribed consisted of: Radix Astragali Membranacei (Huang Qi), 20g, Radix Panacis Ginseng (Ren Shen), Radix Angelicae Sinensis (Dang Gui), Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae (Bai Zhu), and Ootheca Mantidis (Sang Piao Xiao), 10g each, and Fructus Alpiniae Oxyphyllae (Yi Zhi Ren), Radix Bupleuri (Chai Hu), Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (Chen Pi), Fructus Schisandrae Chinensis (Wu Wei Zi), and mix-fried Radix Glycyrrhizae Uralensis (Gan Cao), 6g each. One packet of these medicinals was decocted in water and administered per day. After seven days, the condition was completely cured.

In issue # 2, 2002 of Xin Zhong Yi (New Chinese Medicine), Lin Jin-hong also published an article titled, "New Uses of Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang (Supplement the Center & Boost the Qi Decoction)." This article appeared on pages 67-68 of that journal and contained three cases histories.

Case 1: Headache

The patient was a 65 year-old male who was first seen on Sept. 6, 1998. This man had acute pain at the vertex which had been recurring for a half year. Initially the pain had been slight and would come and go. For the last two months, the pain had gradually gotten worse to the point where he was never without it. This pain was worse at night and was slightly less when pressed. In the last day, the patient had caught a cold with sneezing and pain in the nuchal region and vertex. His appetite was ok as were his two excretions. The man was diagnosed with external wind headache and treated via the principles of coursing wind, freeing the flow of the network vessels, dispelling stasis, and stopping pain with Chuan Xiong Cha Tiao San (Ligusticum Wallichium Mixed with Tea Powder) plus Scolopendra Subspinipes (Wu Gong), Radix Angelicae Sinensis (Dang Gui), Fructus Viticis (Man Jing Zi), and Rhizoma Gastrodiae Elatae (Tian Ma) in a water-based decoction. After taking three packets of these medicinals, there was no improvement in the headache or other symptoms. Additionally, the man complained of lack of strength in the four limbs and somnolence. Therefore, the previous treatment was stopped and the man was re-examined. At this time, the patients facial complexion was white and there was lassitude of the spirit, a pale tongue with thin, white fur, and a large, forceless pulse. CT scan showed slight brain atrophy and shrinkage.

Based on the above, the mans pattern was categorized as qi vacuity downward falling and the treatment principles were changed to mainly boosting the qi and upbearing the clear assisted by dispelling stasis. The formula prescribed consisted of: Radix Astragali Membranacei (Huang Qi), 40g, Radix Codonopsitis Pilosulae (Dang Shen), 30g, Radix Angelicae Sinensis (Dang Gui), Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae (Bai Zhu), Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (Chen Pi), Rhizoma Cimicifugae (Sheng Ma), Radix Bupleuri (Chai Hu), and Radix Ligustici Wallichii (Chuan Xiong), 10g each, Radix Albus Paeoniae Lactiflorae (Bai Shao) and Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae (Dan Shen), 20g each, and mix-fried Radix Glycyrrhizae Uralensis (Gan Cao), 9g. One packet of these medicinals was decocted in water and administered per day. After two packets, the headache was markedly decreased and the mans mood was improved. After another three packets, the headache was eliminated. Therefore, Chuan Xiong was removed from the formula and 30 grams of cooked Radix Rehmanniae Glutinosae (Shu Di) were added. Each week, the man took one packet of these medicinals. On follow-up after two years, there had been no recurrence.

Case 2: Lochiorrhea

The patient was a 36 year-old female who was initially examined on Sept. 14, 1998. Recently the woman had surgery for an ectopic pregnancy. Two weeks later and she was still bleeding from her vaginal orifice. She had taken Herba Leonuri Heterophylli (Yi Mu Cao) both orally and intravenously and was treated with several other formulas. However, her symptoms recurred. The day before, her vaginal bleeding had increased, so she came in for an examination. At this time, the womans facial complexion was lusterless and there was a torpid affect, lack of strength in the four limbs, dizziness, blurred vision, and bleeding from the vaginal orifice which was pale in color but sometimes also dark red and contained clots. The patient was nauseous, had a torpid appetite, a bland taste in her mouth, and her stools were loose. There was slight lower abdominal distention but no abdominal pain. Her tongue was pale and fat with white fur, and her pulse was deep and fine. Based on these signs and symptoms, the patients pattern was categorized as the chong and ren having suffered detriment with qi vacuity and blood stasis. Therefore, the treatment principles were to supplement the qi and contain the blood assisted by dispelling stasis. The formula used consisted of: Radix Astragali Membranacei (Huang Qi), 40g, Radix Codonopsitis Pilosulae (Dang Shen), Gelatinum Corii Asini (E Jiao), and Herba Leonuri Heterophylli (Yi Mu Cao), 30g each, Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae (Bai Zhu), Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (Chen Pi), Rhizoma Cimicifugae (Sheng Ma), and Radix Bupleuri (Chai Hu), 10g each, Radix Angelicae Sinensis (Dang Gui) and Fructus Crataegi (Shan Zha), 15g each, and blast-fried Rhizoma Zingiberis Officinalis (Pao Jiang), 1 small piece.

One packet of these medicinals was decocted in water and administered per day warm, morning and evening. After taking one packet, the patient expelled lots of clots from her vagina and her dizziness and blurred vision decreased. After taking two packets, the vaginal bleeding lessened and all her other symptoms markedly improved. There was no nausea, but she did still have lack of strength, fear of chill, and a bland taste in the mouth. The womans tongue and pulse were the same as before. Therefore, 60 grams of Terra Flava Usta (Fu Long Gan) was added to the formula and the amount of Pao Jiang was doubled. After three packets of these medicinals, the vaginal bleeding disappeared and all the other symptoms were eliminated. The Fu Long Gan, Yi Mu Cao, and Pao Jiang were removed for the patients formula and another three packets were administered, after which the patient was cured.

Case 3: Dizziness

The patient was a 68 year-old female who was first seen on Dec. 3, 1999. Three mon ths previously, the woman had had surgery for right-sided breast cancer. Happily, no affected lymph nodes were found. Two weeks after surgery the wound healed and the womans condition gradually improved. However, she commonly was dizzy and had blurred vision as well as generalized lack of strength and poor appetite. The woman was readmitted to the hospital were she received an intravenous drip of Bu Xue Kang (Supplement Blood Health) as well as several different types of medications and formulas, including multivitamins for two months. After this, although the woman felt she had regained her strength, her dizziness had not decreased, her appetite was still poor, and she had a pale tongue with white fur and a deep, fine pulse. Based on these signs and symptoms, the patients pattern was categorized as qi and blood dual depletion, and the treatment principles were to supplement the qi and boost the blood, quicken the blood and foster essence. The formula used for these purposes consisted of: Radix Astragali Membranacei (Huang Qi) Radix Codonopsitis Pilosulae (Dang Shen), Plastrum Testudinis (Gui Ban), and cooked Radix Rehmanniae Glutinosae (Shu Di), 30g each, Radix Angelicae Sinensis (Dang Gui) and Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae (Bai Zhu), 12g each, Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (Chen Pi), Rhizoma Cimicifugae (Sheng Ma), Radix Ligustici Wallichii (Chuan Xiong), and Radix Bupleuri (Chai Hu), 9g each, and Radix Albus Paeoniae Lactiflorae (Bai Shao), 15g. After taking three packets of these medicinals, the dizziness was markedly improved as was the lack of appetite. Therefore, the prescribing practitioner added 30 grams of Fructus Germinatus Oryzae Sativae (Gu Ya) and prescribed another 14 packets. After this, the patients condition had returned to the same as before undergoing surgery. She then took Bu Zhong Yi Qi Wan (Supplement the Center & Boost the Qi Pills) for a half year and was judged cured.  

In issue #3, 2002 of Xin Zhong Yi (New Chinese Medicine), Zheng Ya-lan and Wang Su-min published an article titled, "New Uses of Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang (Supplement the Center & Boost the Qi," which appeared on pages 70-71 of that journal.

Case 1: Oral sores

The patient was a 63 year-old female who was initially examined on Oct. 12, 1998. This woman had had oral sores and pain for several years with recurrent outbreaks. The surface of the sores was greyish white and eating or drinking stimulating foods made the pain worse. Accompanying symptoms included dizziness, shortness of breath, generalized lack of strength, a bland taste in the mouth, torpid intake, and loose stools. The woman had already undergone several treatments in the stomatology department with vitamin B complex tablets and external applications, but the effects were not good. Therefore, she decided to try Chinese medicine. At the time of examination, the patient had ulcers on both cheeks and the tip of her tongue. These were the size of a soybean or a mung bean. Her tongue was pale red with thin, white fur, and her pulse was deep and fine. Based on these signs and symptoms, her pattern was categorized as spleen-stomach qi vacuity with blood not nourishing the tongue. Therefore, the treatment principles were to supplement the qi and fortify the spleen, and the formula consisted of: Radix Astragali Membranacei (Huang Qi) and Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae (Bai Zhu), 30g each, Rhizoma Cimicifugae (Sheng Ma) and Radix Bupleuri (Chai Hu), 10g each, Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (Chen Pi), mix-fried Radix Glycyrrhizae Uralensis (Gan Cao), and Cortex Cinnamomi Cassiae (Rou Gui), 6g each, Radix Angelicae Sinensis (Dang Gui), 9g, Radix Codonopsitis Pilosulae (Dang Shen) and Fructus Crataegi (Shan Zha), 20g each, and Fructus Cardamomi (Bai Dou Kou) and Massa Medica Fermentata (Shen Qu), 15g each. One packet of these medicinals was decocted in water and administered per day for seven days, after which, the oral sores were markedly decreased in number and the size of the lesions had shrunk. The patients mood had also improved as well as her other signs and symptoms. she still had 3-4 mung bean sized lesions on the tip of her tongue. Her tongue and pulse were the same as before. Therefore, she was prescribed the same formula plus 20 grams of Sclerotium Poriae Cocos (Fu Ling) for half a month. By then, all this patients symptoms had disappeared. She was prescribed Bu Zhong Yi Qi Wan (Supplement the Center & Boost the Qi Pills) plus Gui Pi Wan (Restore the Spleen Pills) to consolidate the treatment effect. On follow-up after one half year, there had been no recurrence.

Case 2: Tinnitus

The patient was a 75 year-old female who was initially examined on Aug. 12, 1999. This woman had had tinnitus, ear pain, and decreased auditory acuity for two months. Two months previous she had caught a cold with nasal congestion and runny nose for which she had received treatment at the ENT department. These treatments as well as Chinese herbal medicine had not been effective for the tinnitus and decreased hearing. These symptoms were accompanied by dizziness, lassitude of the spirit, and lack of strength which were made worse by taxation, torpid intake, encumbered, heavy limbs, and slightly loose stools. Her tongue was pale red with thin, white fur, and her pulse was deep and fine. Based on these signs and symptoms, the patients pattern was categorized as spleen-stomach vacuity weakness with clear qi not being upborne. Therefore, the treatment principles were to supplement the center and boost the qi, upbear and lift the clear qi, and the formula prescribed consisted of: Radix Astragali Membranacei (Huang Qi), 30g, Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae (Bai Zhu) and Radix Codonopsitis Pilosulae (Dang Shen), 20g each, Rhizoma Cimicifugae (Sheng Ma), Radix Bupleuri (Chai Hu), and Radix Angelicae Sinensis (Dang Gui), 10g each, Rhizoma Acori Graminei (Shi Chang Pu), Fructus Xanthii Sibirici (Cang Er Zi), and Radix Albus Paeoniae Lactiflorae (Bai Shao), 15g each, and Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (Chen Pi) and mix-fried Radix Glycycrrhizae Uralensis (Gan Cao), 6g each. After taking seven packets of these medicinals, the patients mood had improved as had her dizziness, lassitude of the spirit, lack of strength, heavy, encumbered limbs, and torpid intake. However, there was still tinnitus like chirping cicadas and her hearing was only slightly better. Therefore, the same formula was represcribed with the addition of 15 grams each of Rhizoma Gastrodiae Elatae (Tian Ma), Cortex Eucommiae Ulmoidis (Du Zhong), and Radix Morindae Officinalis (Ba Ji Tian). The patient took these medicinals for three months and her tinnitus and hearing improved and all her other symptoms were cured. On follow-up after one year, the patient was healthy and well.

Case 3: Ulcers

The patient was a 68 year-old male who was initially examined on Jun. 8, 1998. In 1997, this man had undergone surgery and chemotherapy for stomach cancer. Due to chemotherapy caused vasculitis, he had developed a sore on the ventral surface of  his upper arm just above the elbow joint. The skin in this area was red and swollen. External applications were made to this sore, but they were without effect. Gradually, this condition worsened and eventually the skin ulcerated. The ulcer was 20cm x 12cm in size and, within, its depression  had a shiny or glossy head. The surrounding tissue was white although the immediate edge of the lesion was dark. The lesion leaked a watery fluid, the skin was hard, and there was pressure pain. Accompanying symptoms included lassitude of the spirit, somnolence, shortness of breath, lack of strength, insidious pain in the stomach duct region, an occasional distended feeling, acid regurgitation, and loose stools once per day. The mans tongue was pale yet dark with thin, white fur, and his pulse was deep and fine. Based on this, his pattern was categorized as spleen-stomach qi vacuity with qi and blood depletion and scantiness. Therefore, the treatment principles were to boost the qi and nourish the blood, supplement the spleen and nourish the stomach.

The formula used consisted of: Radix Astragali Membranacei (Huang Qi), 40g, Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae (Bai Zhu), Radix Codonopsitis Pilosulae (Dang Shen), and Herba Oldenlandiae Diffusae Cum Radice (Bai Hua She She Cao), 20g each, Rhizoma Cimicifugae (Sheng Ma), Radix Bupleuri (Chai Hu), Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (Chen Pi), and mix-fried Radix Glycyrrhizae Uralensis (Gan Cao), 10g each, Fructus Amomi (Sha Ren), Radix Angelicae Sinensis (Dang Gui), and Fructus Citri Sacrodactylis (Fo Shou), 15g each, Semen Coicis Lachryma-jobi (Yi Yi Ren), 30g, and Rhizoma Curcumae Zedoariae (E Zhu), 12g. One packet of these medicinals was decocted in water and administered per day. After seven days, the patients mood had improved as did his shortness of breath, lack of strength, and somnolence. There was still some stomach duct discomfort and distention as well as some sticky phlegm in his throat. Therefore, 15 grams of Rhizoma Pinelliae Ternatae (Ban Xia) was added to the above formula. After a half month of treatment, the man came back for his third visit. His mood was good, his abdominal distention was less, and all his other symptoms had disappeared. In addition, the leakage from the upper arm ulcer was less. The man continued taking Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang (Supplement the Center & Boost the Qi Decoction) combined with Shen Ling Bai Zhu San (Ginseng, Poria & Atractylodes Powder) with additions and subtractions for half a year. At this point, the ulcer had basically healed. The skin around the edges was red and moist and the tissue had turned soft. The man continued treatment with Chinese medicinals to regulate and rectify his spleen and stomach and to combat cancer.

In issue #3, 2001 of Xin Zhong Yi (New Chinese Medicine), Jun Wen-yan published an article titled, "New Uses of Bu Zhong Yi Qi Tang (Supplement the Center & Boost the Qi Decoction)," on page 68 of that journal.

Case 1: External auditory meatus granuloma

The patient was a 39 year-old male who was initially seen on Apr. 21, 1999. This mans left ear hurt and had been leaking blood for two months. When examined, a granuloma was found inside the auditory meatus which was the size of a mung bean. Its surface was shiny and smooth and it easily bled. The man had already been treated with antibiotics and Long Dan Xie Gan Tang (Gentiana Drain the Liver Decoction) without result. In addition, the man habitually ate sweet, fatty, thick-flavored foods. The patients facial complexion was a somber, lusterless white. He also had shortness of breath, lack of strength, sweating, a bitter taste in the mouth, heart vexation, yellow urination, a pale red tongue with thin, slimy fur, and a deep, fine, forceless pulse. Based on the foregoing, the mans pattern was categorized as spleen-stomach vacuity weakness with the spleen not transforming dampness. The formula prescribed consisted of: Radix Astragali Membranacei (Huang Qi), 30g, Sclerotium Poriae Cocos (Fu Ling) and Radix Codonopsitis Pilosulae (Dang Shen), 20g each, and Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (Chen Pi), Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae (Bai Zhu), Rhizoma Cimicifugae (Sheng Ma), Radix Bupleuri (Chai Hu), Bulbus Fritllariae Thunbergii (Zhe Bei Mu), Rhizoma Alismatis (Ze xie), stir-fried Radix Scutellariae Baicalensis (Huang Qin), Spica Prunellae Vulgaris (Xia Ku Cao), Spina Gledistchiae Chinensis (Zao Jiao Ci), 10g each. One packet of these medicinals was decocted in water and administered per day. After taking five packets of these medicinals, the ear pain had decreased and the bleeding had stopped, while the granuloma had shrunk to the size of a grain of rice. The patients mood was better and all his symptoms had improved. Therefore, Huang Qin and Ze Xie were removed and 20 grams of Semen Coicis Lachryma-jobi (Yi Yi Ren) and 15 grams of Semen Benincasae Hispidae (Dong Gua Zi) were added. After taking 10 packets of these medicinals, the ear pain disappeared and the auditory meatus had returned to normal. The man was advised to adopt a clear, bland diet. On follow-up after half a year, there had been no recurrence.

Case 2: Nosebleed

The patient was a 52 year-old female who was initially examined on Jan. 12, 1999. The man had left-sided nosebleeding which had been recurring for the last five days. The amount of blood was profuse and its color was pale. He had already tried large doses of heat-clearing, blood-cooling medicinals to no effect. Accompanying symptoms included shortness of breath, lack of strength, a somber white facial complexion, decreased appetite, loose stools, a pale tongue with thin, white fur, and a fine, weak pulse. Based on this, the mans pattern was discriminated as spleen-stomach vacuity weakness with the qi not containing the blood. The formula prescribed consisted of: Radix Codonopsitis Pilosulae (Dang Shen), 20g, Radix Astragali Membranacei (Huang Qi), Radix Angelicae Sinensis (Dang Gui), and Rhizoma Cimicifugae (Sheng Ma), 15g each, Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae (Bai Zhu), Fructus Zizyphi Jujubae (Da Zao), Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (Chen Pi), Radix Albus Paeoniae Lactiflorae (Bai Shao), Rhizoma Imperatae Cylindricae (Bai Mao Gen), carbonized Cacumen Biotae Orientalis (Ce Bai Ye), and Nodus Rhizomatis Nelumbinis Nuciferae (Ou Jie), 10g each. One packet of these medicinals was decocted in water and administered per day. After 10 packets of these medicinals, the bleeding had stopped. There were now only small threads of blood in the nasal mucus. All the other signs and symptoms had disappeared and there was no longer any ulceration within the nose. To consolidate the treatment effect, Bu Zhong Yi Qi Wan (Supplement the Center & Boost the Qi Pills) were prescribed at nine grams each time, two times per day. On follow-up after three months, there had been no recurrence.

Case 3: Parapharyngeal cysts

The patient was a 57 year-old female who was first seen on Aug. 22, 1997. This patient had had a sore throat for 20 days. The pain was continuous and it involved the right side of the ear region. This pain was accompanied by difficulty swallowing. CT scan showed the tonsil on the right side had a cystic growth 5.5cm x 3.1cm x 4.4cm. The Western MDs first tried treating this condition with large doses of intravenous antibiotics, such as penicillin, but without effect. Then they wanted to excise this growth with surgery. The patient declined and decided to try Chinese medicine instead. At that time, the patients tongue was pale red with thin, white fur, and her pulse was vacuous, large, and forceless. Therefore, her pattern was discriminated as a central qi vacuity weakness, and the formula prescribed consisted of: Radix Astragali Membranacei (Huang Qi), Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae (Dan Shen), Sclerotium Poriae Cocos (Fu Ling), and Radix Codonopsitis Pilosulae (Dang Shen), 20g each, Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae (Bai Zhu), Fasciculus Vascularis Luffae Cylindricae (Si Gua Luo), Pericarpium Citri Reticulatae (Chen Pi), Rhizoma Cimicifugae (Sheng Ma), and Radix Bupleuri (Chai Hu), 10g each, Radix Angelicae Sinensis (Dang Gui), Bulbus Fritillariae Thunbergii (Zhe Bei Mu), and Thallus Algae (Kun Bu), 15g each, and Flos Carthami Tinctorii (Hong Hua), 6g. One packet of these medicinals was decocted in water and administered per day. After taking six packets, the patients mood was better and her appetite had increased. The difficulty swallowing had lessened and the swelling in the throat had shrunk by half. After taking yet another 15 packets, the throat pain had disappeared and the throat had visually returned to normal. CT scan showed the right tonsil was normal. There was no recurrence on follow-up after half a year

http://www.bluepoppy.com/press/journal/issues/articles/oct03/oct03_ezine_buzhong2.cfm

Buzhong Yiqi Wan (Reinforcing the Middle-jiao and Replenishing Qi 200 x 12)

Bu Zhong Yi Qi Wan, Reinforcing the Middle-Jiao and Replenishing Qi, 12 packs, 200 concentrated pills each pack. Manufactured by Lanzhou Traditional Herbs, China

The original prescription comes from Treatise on the Spleen and Stomach.

Composition: Radix Astragali seu Hedysari, Radix Codonopsis Pilosulare, Radix Angelicae Sinensis, Rhizoma Atractylodis Macrocephalae, Exocarpium Citri Grandis, Radix Glycyrrhizae Praeparata, Rhizoma Cimicifugae, Radix Bupleuri, Fructus Ziziphi Jujubae, Rhizoma Zingiberis Recens.

Actions: Strengthening the middle-jiao, replenishing qi and elevating yang to treat prolapses of the internal organs.

Indications: Deficiency of spleen and stomach and collapse of middle-jiao energy, manifested as shortness of breath, disinclination for speech, tiredness, weakness, or prolapse of rectum, or fever due to deficiency of vital energy, pale tongue with white fur, empty and weak pulse.

Applications: The prescription is originally applied to fever due to internal damage. Now it is commonly used for prolapse of rectum, gastroptosis and prolapse of uterus due to deficiency and collapse of vital energy. Applicable to the cases of common cold with deficiency of vital energy manifested as lingering fever, profuse sweating, pale tongue and weak pulse. Also applicable to the cases of septicemia, pulmonary tuberculosis, aplastic anemia, leukemia and summer fever which are manifested as fever due to deficiency of vital energy.

Directions: As dietary supplement, take 8 concentrated pills each time, three times a day.

http://www.china-guide.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=C&Product_Code=hr00bz312&Category_Code=QBT

Leave a Reply

*